Saturday, April 25, 2009

More on Opening up Public School Access to Web 2.0

The following SlideShare offers a constructive approach to bring Web 2.0 and Social Networking into schools.

Just think what this approach would need in terms of education for our public school leadership, government and above all the teachers.
It would not happen in Australia without strong leadership from State and Federal government and that does not seem likely as the vast majority of them do not understand how children learn and can be engaged. Even worse, few show any indications of understanding the immense learning potential of Web 2.0 and social networking technology.
The shame is that the private schools, who in many cases have more appropriate responses to child protection, will continue to innovate in the effective use of new technologies and the gap between private and public school students' achievement will continue to broaden, and at an ever increasing rate.
From a social justice position (mine) this appalling as it is denying the most socially disadvantaged the tools that could actually bridge the gap and change their lives positively and dramatically.

3 comments:

VRBones said...

Found an interesting question / response on youTube regarding the blocking of youTube in education:

Greg Black, education.au CEO
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5Mqj3m_GBM&feature=channel_page

Michael Cosgrove, ACCC
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAWRJVQ7io0&feature=response_watch

Scot said...

Hi Tony,
This is certainly a hot topic in Australia and it is not going to go away.

There are substantial equity issues here as well as issues around the role of schools in preparing 21st century graduates.

Best,

Scot.

Judy said...

I have been using some of the web 2.0 tools like flashcards,photos,videos,
slideshare.students find e-learning more interesting and are able to grasp better and the class room is very interactive!It's the teacher's responsibility to guide students to use these tools in a right way for the betterment of their learning.